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COMMENTS - 17 -
  • June 16, 2009 at 7:16 pm Lars

    Red Bull also bought Salzburg’s hockey team EC Salzburg and rebranded them EC Red Bull Salzburg in 2000.

  • June 16, 2009 at 7:17 pm Tom Dunmore

    Interesting to hear, Lars — how did that go down? Any protest?

  • June 17, 2009 at 12:59 am Chris O

    Great article, Tom. It’ll certainly be interesting to see (a) how successful they are and (b) how popular they are.

    It does seem strange to think that whole region of Germany is without a decent team of any sort. You can see why Red Bull pounced on Markranstädt.

  • June 17, 2009 at 2:01 am Chemieblogger

    Thank you Tom for popularizing these important facts and backgrounds of the progressing history of Red Bull’s rebranding of football clubs in the anglophone region. As a local football fan living in Leipzig I can state that local protests have been started and will go on. For RB Leipzig playing against the local traditional clubs FC Sachsen and 1. FC Lok in the next season will be hell.

  • June 17, 2009 at 4:30 am Lars

    Tom, i am not sure, but i am assuming it went down better with hockey, because hockey is seen as very Americanized anyway, and there are plenty of hockey clubs in Europe without a proper cultural heritage, especially in central Europe.

    To be honest i just think it is completely crazy that a company with really only one product can make so much money. Something tells me that drink doesent cost much to produce. Apart from these team sports, they also own not one, but two Formula 1 racing teams, a NASCAR team, a Brazilian stock car racing team, several youth racing leagues and teams, an entire air race league plus personal sponsorship of many athletes (most of whom will call you “dude”).

  • June 17, 2009 at 5:40 am Michał

    one brand I sincerely hate 🙂

  • June 17, 2009 at 6:00 am Sheps

    The other day I bought four cans of red bull and poured them all into a large empty coke bottle so I didn’t have to drink each can at once. They about half filled the bottle for £4. So a full bottle of red bull would be £8 (around $11 maybe) whereas a bottle of coke here is £1.79. In short, red bull costs about 5 times as much as coke. Which is ridiculous but also explains the success of the company.

  • June 17, 2009 at 11:14 am Michal

    True, Sheps. You pay for their marketing so much. It’s not the recipe, they sell it to different companies which then modify it. Thankfully I don’t think they are number one in Polish market any more, outgrown by their own “child”. Anyhow – if there is a club with its history, even if it’s a short one like Metrostars’ or of local importance like Markranstadt – the least they could do is respect it, not even mentioning Austria Salzburg…

  • June 17, 2009 at 12:56 pm redduffman

    I think it will work. If Dietmar Hopp can transform Hoffenheim then Red Bull can do the same at Leipzig.

  • June 17, 2009 at 5:45 pm Ramunas

    Red bull – where else than sports. I mean, the drink is supposedly energetic, but it’s nothing more than water packed with glucose and caffeine. Still, an energy drink with “soul” has larger marketing value than a cup of coffee. If Red Bull does what they promise, the club would really be better off.

  • June 19, 2009 at 9:14 am ursus arctos

    This is profoundly depressing (as is the continued profitability of Red Bull in general).

    The cynicism of the entire plan is quite breath-taking, and one can only hope that they fare even worse on the pitch than the Saxon teams with real fans.

    BTW, Tom, there is a rogue “Saxony” in front of Fortuna Duesseldorf in the text. Duesseldorf is in North Rhine Westphalia (and Fortuna were promoted to the 2. Liga this season, so there remains hope for their non-branded future).

  • June 19, 2009 at 10:35 am Tom Dunmore

    Spiegel had an article on this today with some more detail: http://www.spiegel.de/international/germany/buying-its-way-to-the-bundesliga-red-bull-wants-to-caffeinate-small-soccer-club-a-631450.html

    They’ve really chosen their target well this time, a region desperate for a winner even if it’s branded Red Bull, it seems — though the opening paragraph on the protest isn’t followed up very well.

    Thanks for the correction, Ursus. I’m glad there is a little hope out there…

  • June 21, 2009 at 12:27 am Martin

    Red Bull has a very strong future in this field and they are ready to spend 100s millions in this field .. I have to say I’m supporting them .

  • June 21, 2009 at 8:12 am Michal

    Well Martin, some prefer supporting football teams rather than companies. It’s all ok when they just take up sponsoring, but not when they trash club identities just to promote their brand. Destroying a club just to strenghten their own image is real disrespect to the fanbase and hopefully they will not ever try to think about invading our market with this idea.

  • August 5, 2009 at 2:51 am Mark Coffee

    I guess time will tell if the branding has the exposure they want to get- its at least beeter than being branded by a beer similar alcohol company.

  • August 8, 2009 at 1:03 am tiktech

    Well Martin, some prefer supporting football teams rather than companies. It’s all ok when they just take up sponsoring, but not when they trash club identities just to promote their brand. Destroying a club just to strenghten their own image is real disrespect to the fanbase and hopefully they will not ever try to think about invading our market with this idea.

  • November 12, 2009 at 5:28 am voip

    I have been travelling around in Europe for a month, and although with the break, there wasn’t much football on my busy programme, I did nevertheless notice some things:-I was in Barcelona when R.D. Espanyol inaugurated their new stadium by winning a 3-0 victory against Liverpool. I have always felt some sympathy for Español for being the “little guys” in Barcelona, and was happy to see them play Click to continue reading…