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Gimnasia y Esgrima La Plata

Robben from an AP photo on telegraph.co.uk

A Mental Game: Pain

Andrew Guest considers flopping, pain and perception: does it really hurt, Arjen?

Goals for Galilee and Arab Soccer in a Jewish State

Our regular book reviewer Alex Usher delves into football in Israel with Jerrold Kessel and Pierre Klochendler’s Goals for Galilee: The Triumphs and Traumas of the Sons of Sakhnin, Israel’s Arab Football Club and Tamir Sorek’s Arab Soccer in a Jewish State.

The Anatomy of England

Alex Usher reviews Jonathan Wilson’s new book on the history of the England national team, coming away rather underwhelmed.

America Wakes Up To The World Cup

On the morning of the United States’ most hyped game ever, we comb through America’s hundreds of daily newspapers to see what Americans are reading about the World Cup on their front pages today.

The World Is A Ball

Alex Usher concludes that John Doyle’s new book on his World Cup travels is a little on the smug side.

Post-Invictus: South Africa’s Greatest Soccer Moment

Andrew Guest pieces together the story of South Africa’s triumphant hosting of the 1996 African Cup of Nations, offering it as an important complement to ‘Invictus’ and the Rugby World Cup seven months prior.

Fan Ownership: A Practical Future?

Yesterday, we looked at how the idea of fan ownership has received serious attention in recent weeks, with the growing profiles of supporters’ trusts at English clubs. Today, wrapping up our weeklong series, we look at the the practicalities of cash, stadiums and regulations in fan ownership schemes.

A Brand History of the European Championship

FMountains. Flowers. Hearts. Stars. No, these are not elements of a new children’s breakfast cereal – they are visual signifiers of the world’s second–most prominent international football tournament. JL Murtaugh looks at the brand identities that have defined the European Championship.

Rival Leagues and Pitch Invasions: American Soccer in 1967

The failure of the USL and NASL to receive sanctioning from the USSF as Division II leagues for the 2010 season is a reminder of the days in American soccer when the country had competing leagues fighting for FIFA and USSF approval.

The Police Playing the Policed

I am a founding officer for the Union Football League, an AYSO-affiliated adult league which plays near downtown Los Angeles. When we heard that the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) would field a team during our first season we were a bit wary.

The Timbers Army

Portland in MLS: The Origins of the Timbers Army

As they say in other soccer countries, we’re going up. Today, Major League Soccer commissioner Don Garber anointed the Portland Timbers—our modest local soccer team with the not-so-modest grassroots fan following, the Timbers Army—as the latest franchise in the nation’s top soccer league.

The Business of Euro 2008

The corporate branding at Euro 2008 was pervasive. Marc Bahnsen considers what this meant for the casual fan at the tournament, looks at protest against Euro 2008, and some clever counter-marketing.

Inside Chelsea’s Propaganda Machine

Wouldn’t writing for the club you supported be your dream job? Not so for Terry Daley, who found a different reality working for Chelsea’s official publications.

Sexism Hurts

Jennifer Doyle looks at how the ingrained sexism in sports medicine is damaging to women’s football.

Glory Glory Tottenham Hotspur

If you are lucky enough to visit White Hart Lane on match day, you might hear the Tottenham fans chant “Glory, Glory Tottenham Hotspur” to the tune of the song popularly known as “The Battle Hymn of the Republic”. Jennifer Doyle looks at the oft-forgotten origins of this stirring tune in 19th century America.